Manual Page

routinator - RPKI relying party software

Date

YYYY-MM-DD

Author

Martin Hoffmann

Copyright

2019-2021 - NLnet Labs

Version

0.10.2-dev

Synopsis

routinator options init init-options

routinator options vrps vrps-options -o output-file -f format

routinator options validate validate-options -a asn -p prefix

routinator options server server-options

routinator options update update-options

routinator man -o file

routinator -h

routinator -V

Description

Routinator collects and processes Resource Public Key Infrastructure (RPKI) data. It validates the Route Origin Attestations contained in the data and makes them available to your BGP routing workflow.

It can either run in one-shot mode outputting a list of validated route origins in various formats or as a server for the RPKI-to-Router (RTR) protocol that routers often implement to access the data, or via HTTP.

These modes and additional operations can be chosen via commands. For the available commands, see Commands below.

Options

The available options are:

-c path, --config=path

Provides the path to a file containing basic configuration. If this option is not given, Routinator will try to use $HOME/.routinator.conf if that exists. If that doesn’t exist, either, default values for the options as described here are used.

See Configuration File below for more information on the format and contents of the configuration file.

-b dir, --base-dir=dir

Specifies the base directory to keep status information in. Unless overwritten by the -r or -t options, the local repository will be kept in the sub-directory repository and the TALs will be kept in the sub-directory tals.

If omitted, the base directory defaults to $HOME/.rpki-cache.

-r dir, --repository-dir=dir

Specifies the directory to keep the local repository in. This is the place where Routinator stores the RPKI data it has collected and thus is a copy of all the data referenced via the trust anchors.

-t dir, --tal-dir=dir

Specifies the directory containing the trust anchor locators (TALs) to use. Trust anchor locators are the starting points for collecting and validating RPKI data. See Trust Anchor Locators for more information on what should be present in this directory.

-x file, --exceptions=file

Provides the path to a local exceptions file. The option can be used multiple times to specify more than one file to use. Each file is a JSON file as described in RFC 8416. It lists both route origins that should be filtered out of the output as well as origins that should be added.

--strict

If this option is present, the repository will be validated in strict mode following the requirements laid out by the standard documents very closely. With the current RPKI repository, using this option will lead to a rather large amount of invalid route origins and should therefore not be used in practice.

See Relaxed Decoding below for more information.

--stale=policy

This option defines how deal with stale objects. In RPKI, manifests and CRLs can be stale if the time given in their next-update field is in the past, indicating that an update to the object was scheduled but didn’t happen. This can be because of an operational issue at the issuer or an attacker trying to replay old objects.

There are three possible policies that define how Routinator should treat stale objects.

A policy of reject instructs Routinator to consider all stale objects invalid. This will result in all material published by the CA issuing this manifest and CRL to be invalid including all material of any child CA.

The warn policy will allow Routinator to consider any stale object to be valid. It will, however, print a warning in the log allowing an operator to follow up on the issue.

Finally, the accept policy will cause Routinator to quietly accept any stale object as valid.

In Routinator 0.8.0 and newer, reject is the default policy if the option is not provided. In version 0.7.0 the default for this option was warn. In all previous versions warn was hard-wired.

--unsafe-vrps=policy

This option defines how to deal with “unsafe VRPs.” If the address prefix of a VRP overlaps with any resources assigned to a CA that has been rejected because if failed to validate completely, the VRP is said to be unsafe since using it may lead to legitimate routes being flagged as RPKI invalid.

There are three options how to deal with unsafe VRPS:

A policy of reject will filter out these VRPs. Warnings will be logged to indicate which VRPs have been filtered

The warn policy will log warnings for unsafe VRPs but will add them to the valid VRPs.

Finally, the accept policy will quietly add unsafe VRPs to the valid VRPs.

Currently, the default policy is warn in order to gain operational experience with the frequency and impact of unsafe VRPs. This default may change in future version.

For more information on the process of validation implemented in Routinator, see the section VALIDATION below.

--unknown-objects=policy

Defines how to deal with unknown types of RPKI objects. Currently, only certificates (.cer), CRLs (.crl), manifests (.mft), ROAs (.roa), and Ghostbuster Records (.gbr) are allowed to appear in the RPKI repository.

There are, once more, three policies for dealing with an object of any other type:

The reject policy will reject the object as well as the entire CA. Consequently, an unknown object appearing in a CA will mark all other objects issued by the CA as invalid as well.

The policy of warn will log a warning, ignore the object, and accept all known objects issued by the CA.

The similar policy of accept will quietly ignore the object and accept all known objects issued by the CA.

The default policy if the option is missing is warn.

Note that even if unknown objects are accepted, they must appear in the manifest and the hash over their content must match the one given in the manifest. If the hash does not match, the CA and all its objects are still rejected.

--allow-dubious-hosts

As a precaution, Routinator will reject rsync and HTTPS URIs from RPKI data with dubious host names. In particular, it will reject the name localhost, host names that consist of IP addresses, and a host name that contains an explicit port.

This option allows to disable this filtering.

--fresh

Delete and re-initialize the local data storage before starting. This option should be used when Routinator fails after reporting corrupt data storage.

--disable-rsync

If this option is present, rsync is disabled and only RRDP will be used.

--rsync-command=command

Provides the command to run for rsync. This is only the command itself. If you need to provide options to rsync, use the rsync-args configuration file setting instead.

If this option is not given, Routinator will simply run rsync and hope that it is in the path.

--rsync-timeout=seconds

Sets the number of seconds an rsync command is allowed to run before it is terminated early. This protects against hanging rsync commands that prevent Routinator from continuing. The default is 300 seconds which should be long enough except for very slow networks.

--disable-rrdp

If this option is present, RRDP is disabled and only rsync will be used.

--rrdp-fallback-time=seconds

Sets the maximum time in seconds since a last successful update of an RRDP repository before Routinator falls back to using rsync. The default is 3600 seconds. If the given value is smaller than twice the refresh time, it is silently increased to that value.

The actual time is chosen at random between the refresh time and this value in order to spread out load on the rsync server.

--rrdp-max-delta-count=count

If the number of deltas necessary to update an RRDP repository is larger than the value provided by this option, the snapshot is used instead. If the option is missing, the default of 100 is used.

--rrdp-timeout=seconds

Sets the timeout in seconds for any RRDP-related network operation, i.e., connects, reads, and writes. If this option is omitted, the default timeout of 300 seconds is used. Set the option to 0 to disable the timeout.

--rrdp-connect-timeout=seconds

Sets the timeout in seconds for RRDP connect requests. If omitted, the general timeout will be used.

--rrdp-local-addr=addr

If present, sets the local address that the RRDP client should bind to when doing outgoing requests.

--rrdp-root-cert=path

This option provides a path to a file that contains a certificate in PEM encoding that should be used as a trusted certificate for HTTPS server authentication. The option can be given more than once.

Providing this option does not disable the set of regular HTTPS authentication trust certificates.

--rrdp-proxy=uri

This option provides the URI of a proxy to use for all HTTP connections made by the RRDP client. It can be either an HTTP or a SOCKS URI. The option can be given multiple times in which case proxies are tried in the given order.

--rrdp-keep-responses=path

If this option is enabled, the bodies of all HTTPS responses received from RRDP servers will be stored under path .

The sub-path will be constructed using the components of the requested URI. For the responses to the notification files, the timestamp is appended to the path to make it possible to distinguish the series of requests made over time.

--rrdp-disable-gzip

If this option is present, the gzip transfer encoding is disabled.

--max-object-size=BYTES

Limits the size of individual objects received via either rsync or RRDP to the given number of bytes. The default value if this option is not present is 20,000,000 (i.e., 20 MBytes). Use a value of 0 to disable the limit.

--dirty

If this option is present, unused files and directories will not be deleted from the repository directory after each validation run.

--validation-threads=count

Sets the number of threads to distribute work to for validation. Note that the current processing model validates trust anchors all in one go, so you are likely to see less than that number of threads used throughout the validation run.

-v, --verbose

Print more information. If given twice, even more information is printed.

More specifically, a single -v increases the log level from the default of warn to info, specifying it more than once increases it to debug.

See Logging below for more information on what information is logged at the different levels.

-q, --quiet

Print less information. Given twice, print nothing at all.

A single -q will drop the log level to error. Repeating -q more than once turns logging off completely.

--syslog

Redirect logging output to syslog.

This option is implied if a command is used that causes Routinator to run in daemon mode.

--syslog-facility=facility

If logging to syslog is used, this option can be used to specify the syslog facility to use. The default is daemon.

--logfile=path

Redirect logging output to the given file.

-h, --help

Print some help information.

-V, --version

Print version information.

Commands

Routinator provides a number of operations around the local RPKI repository. These can be requested by providing different commands on the command line.

init

Prepares the local repository directories and the TAL directory for running Routinator. Specifically, makes sure the local repository directory exists, and creates the TAL directory and fills it with the desired TALs.

For more information about TALs, see Trust Anchor Locators below.

-f, --force

Forces installation of the TALs even if the TAL directory already exists.

--rir-tals

Selects the production TALs of the five RIRs for installation. If no other TAL selection options are provided, this option is assumed.

--rir-test-tals

Selects the bundled TALs for RIR testbeds for installation.

--tal=name

Selects the bundled TAL with the provided name for installation.

--skip-tal=name

Deselects the bundled TAL with the given name.

--list-tals

List all bundled TALs and exit. The list also shows which TALs are selected by the --rir-tals and --rir-test-tals options.

--accept-arin-rpa

Before you can use the ARIN TAL, you need to agree to the ARIN Relying Party Agreement (RPA). You can find it at https://www.arin.net/resources/manage/rpki/rpa.pdf and explicitly agree to it via this option. This explicit agreement is necessary in order to install the ARIN TAL.

vrps

This command requests that Routinator update the local repository and then validate the Route Origin Attestations in the repository and output the valid route origins, which are also known as validated ROA payloads or VRPs, as a list.

-o file, --output=file

Specifies the output file to write the list to. If this option is missing or file is - the list is printed to standard output.

-f format, --format=format

The output format to use. Routinator currently supports the following formats:

csv

The list is formatted as lines of comma-separated values of the prefix in slash notation, the maximum prefix length, the autonomous system number, and an abbreviation for the trust anchor the entry is derived from. The latter is the name of the TAL file without the extension .tal. This can be overwritten with the tal-labels config file option.

This is the default format used if the -f option is missing.

csvcompat

The same as csv except that all fields are embedded in double quotes and the autonomous system number is given without the prefix AS. This format is pretty much identical to the CSV produced by the RIPE NCC Validator.

csvext

An extended version of csv each line contains these comma-separated values: the rsync URI of the ROA the line is taken from (or “N/A” if it isn’t from a ROA), the autonomous system number, the prefix in slash notation, the maximum prefix length, the not-before date and not-after date of the validity of the ROA.

This format was used in the RIPE NCC RPKI Validator version 1. That version produces one file per trust anchor. This is not currently supported by Routinator – all entries will be in one single output file.

json

The list is placed into a JSON object with a single element roas which contains an array of objects with four elements each: The autonomous system number of the network authorized to originate a prefix in asn, the prefix in slash notation in prefix, the maximum prefix length of the announced route in maxLength, and the trust anchor from which the authorization was derived in ta. This format is identical to that produced by the RIPE NCC RPKI Validator except for different naming of the trust anchor. Routinator uses the name of the TAL file without the extension .tal whereas the RIPE NCC Validator has a dedicated name for each.

jsonext

The list is placed into a JSON object with a single element roas which contains an array of objects with four elements each: The autonomous system number of the network authorized to originate a prefix in asn, the prefix in slash notation in prefix, the maximum prefix length of the announced route in maxLength.

Extensive information about the source of the object is given in the array source. Each item in that array is an object providing details of a source of the VRP. The object will have a type of roa if it was derived from a valid ROA object or exception if it was an assertion in a local exception file.

For ROAs, uri provides the rsync URI of the ROA, validity provides the validity of the ROA itself, and chainValidity the validity considering the validity of the certificates along the validation chain.

For assertions from local exceptions, path will provide the path of the local exceptions file and, optionally, comment will provide the comment if given for the assertion.

Please note that because of this additional information, output in jsonext format will be quite large.

openbgpd

Choosing this format causes Routinator to produce a roa- set configuration item for the OpenBGPD configuration.

bird1

Choosing this format causes Routinator to produce a roa table configuration item for the BIRD1 configuration.

bird2

Choosing this format causes Routinator to produce a roa table configuration item for the BIRD2 configuration.

rpsl

This format produces a list of RPSL objects with the authorization in the fields route, origin, and source. In addition, the fields descr, mnt-by, created, and last-modified, are present with more or less meaningful values.

summary

This format produces a summary of the content of the RPKI repository. For each trust anchor, it will print the number of verified ROAs and VRPs. Note that this format does not take filters into account. It will always provide numbers for the complete repository.

none

This format produces no output whatsoever.

-n, --noupdate

The repository will not be updated before producing the list.

--complete

If any of the rsync commands needed to update the repository failed, Routinator completes the operation and exits with status code 2. Normally, it would exit with status code 0 indicating success.

-a asn, --select-asn=asn

Only output VRPs for the given ASN. The option can be given multiple times, in which case VRPs for all provided ASNs are provided. ASNs can be given with or without the prefix AS.

-p prefix, --select-prefix=prefix

Only output VRPs with an address prefix that covers the given prefix, i.e., whose prefix is equal to or less specific than the given prefix. This will include VRPs regardless of their ASN and max length. In other words, the output will include all VRPs that need to be considered when deciding whether an announcement for the prefix is RPKI valid or invalid.

The option can be given multiple times, in which case VRPs for all prefixes are provided. It can also be combined with one or more ASN selections. Then all matching VRPs are included. That is, selectors combine as “or” not “and”.

validate

This command can be used to perform RPKI route origin validation for one or more route announcements. Routinator will determine whether the provided announcements are RPKI valid, invalid, or not found.

A single route announcement can be given directly on the command line:

-a asn, --asn=asn

The AS Number of the Autonomous System that originated the route announcement. ASNs can be given with or without the prefix AS.

-p prefix, --prefix=prefix

The address prefix the route announcement is for.

-j, --json

A detailed analysis on the reasoning behind the validation is printed in JSON format including lists of the VRPs that caused the particular result. If this option is omitted, Routinator will only print the determined state.

-i file, --input=file

If present, input is read from the given file. If the file is given is a single dash, input is read from standard output.

-j, --json

If this option is provided, the input is assumed to be JSON format. It should consist of a single object with one member routes which contains an array of objects. Each object describes one route announcement through its prefix and asn members which contain a prefix and originating AS Number as strings, respectively.

If the option is not provided, the input is assumed to consist of simple plain text with one route announcement per line, provided as a prefix followed by an ASCII-art arrow => surrounded by white space and followed by the AS Number of originating autonomous system.

The following additional options are available independently of the input method.

-o file, --output=file

Output is written to the provided file. If the option is omitted or file is given as a single dash, output is written to standard output.

-n, --noupdate

The repository will not be updated before performing validation.

--complete

If any of the rsync commands needed to update the repository failed, Routinator completes the operation and exits with status code 2. Normally, it would exit with status code 0 indicating success.

server

This command causes Routinator to act as a server for the RPKI-to-Router (RTR) and HTTP protocols. In this mode, Routinator will read all the TALs (See Trust Anchor Locators below) and will stay attached to the terminal unless the -d option is given.

The server will periodically update the local repository, every ten minutes by default, notify any clients of changes, and let them fetch validated data. It will not, however, reread the trust anchor locators. Thus, if you update them, you will have to restart Routinator.

You can provide a number of addresses and ports to listen on for RTR and HTTP through command line options or their configuration file equivalent. Currently, Routinator will only start listening on these ports after an initial validation run has finished.

It will not listen on any sockets unless explicitly specified. It will still run and periodically update the repository. This might be useful for use with vrps mode with the -n option.

-d, --detach

If present, Routinator will detach from the terminal after a successful start.

--rtr=addr:port

Specifies a local address and port to listen on for incoming RTR connections.

Routinator supports both protocol version 0 defined in RFC 6810 and version 1 defined in RFC 8210. However, it does not support router keys introduced in version 1. IPv6 addresses must be enclosed in square brackets. You can provide the option multiple times to let Routinator listen on multiple address-port pairs.

--http=addr:port

Specifies the address and port to listen on for incoming HTTP connections. See HTTP Service below for more information on the HTTP service provided by Routinator.

--listen-systemd

The RTR listening socket will be acquired from systemd via socket activation. Use this option together with systemd’s socket units to allow a Routinator running as a regular user to bind to the default RTR port 323.

Currently, all TCP listener sockets handed over by systemd will be used for the RTR protocol.

--rtr-tcp-keepalive=seconds

The amount of seconds the server should wait after having finished updating and validating the local repository before starting to update again. The next update will earlier if objects in the repository expire earlier. The default value is 600 seconds.

--rtr-client-metrics

If provided, the server metrics will include separate metrics for every RTR client. Clients are identified by their RTR source IP address. This is disabled by default to avoid accidentally leaking information about the local network topology.

--refresh=seconds

The amount of seconds the server should wait after having finished updating and validating the local repository before starting to update again. The next update will be earlier if objects in the repository expire earlier. The default value is 600 seconds.

--retry=seconds

The amount of seconds to suggest to an RTR client to wait before trying to request data again if that failed. The default value is 600 seconds, as recommended in RFC 8210.

--expire=seconds

The amount of seconds to an RTR client can keep using data if it cannot refresh it. After that time, the client should discard the data. Note that this value was introduced in version 1 of the RTR protocol and is thus not relevant for clients that only implement version 0. The default value, as recommended in RFC 8210, is 7200 seconds.

--history=count

In RTR, a client can request to only receive the changes that happened since the last version of the data it had seen. This option sets how many change sets the server will at most keep. If a client requests changes from an older version, it will get the current full set.

Note that routers typically stay connected with their RTR server and therefore really only ever need one single change set. Additionally, if RTR server or router are restarted, they will have a new session with new change sets and need to exchange a full data set, too. Thus, increasing the value probably only ever increases memory consumption.

The default value is 10.

--pid-file=path

States a file which will be used in daemon mode to store the processes PID. While the process is running, it will keep the file locked.

--working-dir=path

The working directory for the daemon process. In daemon mode, Routinator will change to this directory while detaching from the terminal.

--chroot=path

The root directory for the daemon process. If this option is provided, the daemon process will change its root directory to the given directory. This will only work if all other paths provided via the configuration or command line options are under this directory.

--user=user-name

The name of the user to change to for the daemon process. It this option is provided, Routinator will run as that user after the listening sockets for HTTP and RTR have been created. The option has no effect unless --detach is also used.

--group=group-name

The name of the group to change to for the daemon process. It this option is provided, Routinator will run as that group after the listening sockets for HTTP and RTR have been created. The option has no effect unless --detach is also used.

update

Updates the local repository by resyncing all known publication points. The command will also validate the updated repository to discover any new publication points that appear in the repository and fetch their data.

As such, the command really is a shortcut for running routinator vrps -f none.

--complete

If any of the rsync commands needed to update the repository failed, Routinator completes the operation and exits with status code 2. Normally, it would exit with status code 0 indicating success.

dump

Writes the content of all stored data to the file system. This is primarily intended for debugging but can be used to get access to the view of the RPKI data that Routinator currently sees.

-o dir, --output=dir

Write the output to the given directory. If the option is omitted, the current directory is used.

Three directories will be created in the output directory:

The rrdp directory will contain all the files collected via RRDP from the various repositories. Each repository is stored in its own directory. The mapping between rpkiNotify URI and path is provided in the repositories.json file. For each repository, the files are stored in a directory structure based on the components of the file as rsync URI.

The rsync directory contains all the files collected via rsync. The files are stored in a directory structure based on the components of the file’s rsync URI.

The store directory contains all the files used for validation. Files collected via RRDP or rsync are copied to the store if they are correctly referenced by a valid manifest. This part contains one directory for each RRDP repository similarly structured to the rrdp directory and one additional directory rsync that contains files collected via rsync.

man

Displays the manual page, i.e., this page.

-o file, --output=file

If this option is provided, the manual page will be written to the given file instead of displaying it. Use - to output the manual page to standard output.

Trust Anchor Locators

RPKI uses trust anchor locators, or TALs, to identify the location and public keys of the trusted root CA certificates. Routinator keeps these TALs in files in the TAL directory which can be set by the -t option. If the -b option is used instead, the TAL directory will be in the subdirectory tals under the directory specified in this option. The default location, if no options are used at all is $HOME/.rpki-cache/tals.

Routinator comes with a set of commonly used TALs that can be used to populate the TAL directory via the init command. By default, the command will install the TALs of the five Regional Internet Registries (RIRs) necessary for the complete global RPKI repository.

If the directory does exist, Routinator will use all files with an extension of .tal in this directory. This means that you can add and remove trust anchors by adding and removing files in this directory. If you add files, make sure they are in the format described by RFC 7730 or the upcoming RFC 8630.

Configuration File

Instead of providing all options on the command line, they can also be provided through a configuration file. Such a file can be selected through the -c option. If no configuration file is specified this way but a file named $HOME/.routinator.conf is present, this file is used.

The configuration file is a file in TOML format. In short, it consists of a sequence of key-value pairs, each on its own line. Strings are to be enclosed in double quotes. Lists can be given by enclosing a comma-separated list of values in square brackets.

The configuration file can contain the following entries. All path values are interpreted relative to the directory the configuration file is located in. All values can be overridden via the command line options.

repository-dir

A string containing the path to the directory to store the local repository in. This entry is mandatory.

tal-dir

A string containing the path to the directory that contains the Trust Anchor Locators. This entry is mandatory.

exceptions

A list of strings, each containing the path to a file with local exceptions. If missing, no local exception files are used.

strict

A boolean specifying whether strict validation should be employed. If missing, strict validation will not be used.

stale

A string specifying the policy for dealing with stale objects.

reject

Consider all stale objects invalid rendering all material published by the CA issuing the stale object to be invalid including all material of any child CA.

warn

Consider stale objects to be valid but print a warning to the log.

accept

Quietly consider stale objects valid.

unsafe-vrps

A string specifying the policy for dealing with unsafe VRPs.

reject

Filter unsafe VRPs and add warning messages to the log.

warn

Warn about unsafe VRPs in the log but add them to the final set of VRPs. This is the default policy if the value is missing.

accept

Quietly add unsafe VRPs to the final set of VRPs.

unknown-objects

A string specifying the policy for dealing with unknown RPKI object types.

reject

Reject the object and its issuing CA.

warn

Warn about the object but ignore it and accept the issuing CA. This is the default policy if the value is missing.

accept

Quietly ignore the object and accept the issuing CA.

allow-dubious-hosts

A boolean value that, if present and true, disables Routinator’s filtering of dubious host names in rsync and HTTPS URIs from RPKI data.

disable-rsync

A boolean value that, if present and true, turns off the use of rsync.

rsync-command

A string specifying the command to use for running rsync. The default is simply rsync.

rsync-args

A list of strings containing the arguments to be passed to the rsync command. Each string is an argument of its own.

If this option is not provided, Routinator will try to find out if your rsync understands the --contimeout option and, if so, will set it to 10 thus letting connection attempts time out after ten seconds. If your rsync is too old to support this option, no arguments are used.

rsync-timeout

An integer value specifying the number seconds an rsync command is allowed to run before it is being terminated. The default if the value is missing is 300 seconds.

disable-rrdp

A boolean value that, if present and true, turns off the use of RRDP.

rrdp-max-delta-count

An integer value that specifies the maximum number of deltas necessary to update an RRDP repository before using the snapshot instead. If the value is missing, the default of 100 is used.

rrdp-timeout

An integer value that provides a timeout in seconds for all individual RRDP-related network operations, i.e., connects, reads, and writes. If the value is missing, a default timeout of 300 seconds will be used. Set the value to 0 to turn the timeout off.

rrdp-fallback-time

An integer value specifying the maximum number of seconds since a last successful update of an RRDP repository before Routinator falls back to using rsync. The default in case the value is missing is 3600 seconds. If the value provided is smaller than twice the refresh time, it is silently increased to that value.

rrdp-connect-timeout

An integer value that, if present, sets a separate timeout in seconds for RRDP connect requests only.

rrdp-local-addr

A string value that provides the local address to be used by RRDP connections.

rrdp-root-certs

A list of strings each providing a path to a file containing a trust anchor certificate for HTTPS authentication of RRDP connections. In addition to the certificates provided via this option, the system’s own trust store is used.

rrdp-proxies

A list of string each providing the URI for a proxy for outgoing RRDP connections. The proxies are tried in order for each request. HTTP and SOCKS5 proxies are supported.

rrdp-keep-responses

A string containing a path to a directory into which the bodies of all HTTPS responses received from RRDP servers will be stored. The sub-path will be constructed using the components of the requested URI. For the responses to the notification files, the timestamp is appended to the path to make it possible to distinguish the series of requests made over time.

rrdp-disable-gzip

A boolean value that determines whether the gzip transfer encoding should be disabled in RRDP requests. If the option is missing, gzip will be used.

max-object-size

An integer value that provides a limit for the size of individual objects received via either rsync or RRDP to the given number of bytes. The default value if this option is not present is 20,000,000 (i.e., 20 MBytes). A value of 0 disables the limit.

dirty

A boolean value which, if true, specifies that unused files and directories should not be deleted from the repository directory after each validation run. If left out, its value will be false and unused files will be deleted.

validation-threads

An integer value specifying the number of threads to be used during validation of the repository. If this value is missing, the number of CPUs in the system is used.

log-level

A string value specifying the maximum log level for which log messages should be emitted. The default is warn.

log

A string specifying where to send log messages to. This can be one of the following values:

default

Log messages will be sent to standard error if Routinator stays attached to the terminal or to syslog if it runs in daemon mode.

stderr

Log messages will be sent to standard error.

syslog

Log messages will be sent to syslog.

file

Log messages will be sent to the file specified through the log-file configuration file entry.

The default if this value is missing is, unsurprisingly, default.

log-file

A string value containing the path to a file to which log messages will be appended if the log configuration value is set to file. In this case, the value is mandatory.

syslog-facility

A string value specifying the syslog facility to use for logging to syslog. The default value if this entry is missing is daemon.

rtr-listen

An array of string values each providing the address and port which the RTR daemon should listen on in TCP mode. Address and port should be separated by a colon. IPv6 address should be enclosed in square brackets.

http-listen

An array of string values each providing the address and port which the HTTP service should listen on. Address and port should be separated by a colon. IPv6 address should be enclosed in square brackets.

listen-systemd

The RTR TCP listening socket will be acquired from systemd via socket activation. Use this option together with systemd’s socket units to allow Routinator running as a regular user to bind to the default RTR port 323.

rtr-tcp-keepalive

An integer value specifying the number of seconds to wait before sending a TCP keepalive on an established RTR connection. If this option is missing, TCP keepalive will be enabled on all RTR connections with an idle time of 60 seconds. If this option is present and set to zero, TCP keepalives are disabled.

rtr-client-metrics

A boolean value specifying whether server metrics should include separate metrics for every RTR client. If the value is missing, no RTR client metrics will be provided.

refresh

An integer value specifying the number of seconds Routinator should wait between consecutive validation runs in server mode. The next validation run will happen earlier, if objects expire earlier. The default is 600 seconds.

retry

An integer value specifying the number of seconds an RTR client is requested to wait after it failed to receive a data set. The default is 600 seconds.

expire

An integer value specifying the number of seconds an RTR client is requested to use a data set if it cannot get an update before throwing it away and continuing with no data at all. The default is 7200 seconds if it cannot get an update before throwing it away and continuing with no data at all. The default is 7200 seconds.

history-size

An integer value specifying how many change sets Routinator should keep in RTR server mode. The default is 10.

pid-file

A string value containing a path pointing to the PID file to be used in daemon mode.

working-dir

A string value containing a path to the working directory for the daemon process.

chroot

A string value containing the path any daemon process should use as its root directory.

user

A string value containing the user name a daemon process should run as.

group

A string value containing the group name a daemon process should run as.

tal-label

An array containing arrays of two string values mapping the name of a TAL file (without the path but including the extension) as given by the first string to the name of the TAL to be included where the TAL is referenced in output as given by the second string.

If the options missing or if a TAL isn’t mentioned in the option, Routinator will construct a name for the TAL by using its file name (without the path) and dropping the extension.

HTTP Service

Routinator can provide an HTTP service allowing to fetch the Validated ROA Payload in various formats. The service does not support HTTPS and should only be used within the local network.

The service only supports GET requests with the following paths:

/metrics

Returns a set of monitoring metrics in the format used by Prometheus.

/status

Returns the current status of the Routinator instance. This is similar to the output of the /metrics endpoint but in a more human friendly format.

/log

Returns the logging output of the last validation run. The log level matches that set upon start.

Note that the output is collected after each validation run and is therefore only available after the initial run has concluded.

/version

Returns the version of the Routinator instance.

/api/v1/validity/as-number/prefix

Returns a JSON object describing whether the route announcement given by its origin AS Number and address prefix is RPKI valid, invalid, or not found. The returned object is compatible with that provided by the RIPE NCC RPKI Validator. For more information, see https://ripe.net/support/documentation/developer-documentation/rpki-validator-api

/validity?asn=as-number&prefix=prefix

Same as above but with a more form-friendly calling convention.

/json-delta, /json-delta?sessionsession?serial=serial

Returns a JSON object with the changes since the dataset version identified by the session and serial query parameters. If a delta cannot be produced from that version, the full data set is returned and the member reset in the object will be set to true. In either case, the members session and serial identify the version of the data set returned and their values should be passed as the query parameters in a future request.

The members announced and withdrawn contain arrays with route origins that have been announced and withdrawn, respectively, since the provided session and serial. If reset is true, the withdrawn member is not present.

In addition, the current set of VRPs is available for each output format at a path with the same name as the output format. E.g., the CSV output is available at /csv.

These paths accept selector expressions to limit the VRPs returned in the form of a query string. The field select-asn can be used to filter for ASNs and the field select-prefix can be used to filter for prefixes. The fields can be repeated multiple times.

This works in the same way as the options of the same name to the vrps command.

Logging

In order to allow diagnosis of the VRP data set as well as its overall health, Routinator logs an extensive amount of information. The log levels used by syslog are utilized to allow filtering this information for particular use cases.

The log levels represent the following information:

error

Information related to events that prevent Routinator from continuing to operate at all as well as all issues related to local configuration even if Routinator will continue to run.

warn

Information about events and data that influences the set of VRPs produced by Routinator. This includes failures to communicate with repository servers, or encountering invalid objects.

info

Information about events and data that could be considered abnormal but do not influence the set of VRPs produced. For example, when filtering of unsafe VRPs is disabled, the unsafe VRPs are logged with this level.

debug

Information about the internal state of Routinator that may be useful for, well, debugging.

Validation

In vrps and server mode, Routinator will produce a set of VRPs from the data published in the RPKI repository. It will walk over all certification authorities (CAs) starting with those referred to in the configured TALs.

Each CA is checked whether all its published objects are present, correctly encoded, and have been signed by the CA. If any of the objects fail this check, the entire CA will be rejected. If an object of an unknown type is encountered, the behaviour depends on the unknown-objects policy. If this policy has a value of reject the entire CA will be rejected. In this case, only certificates (.cer), CRLs (.crl), manifestes (.mft), ROAs (.roa), and Ghostbuster records (.gbr) will be accepted.

If a CA is rejected, none of its ROAs will be added to the VRP set but also none of its child CAs will be considered at all; their published data will not be fetched or validated.

If a prefix has its ROAs published by different CAs, this will lead to some of its VRPs being dropped while others are still added. If the VRP for the legitimately announced route is among those having been dropped, the route becomes RPKI invalid. This can happen both by operator error or through an active attack.

In addition, if a VRP for a less specific prefix exists that covers the prefix of the dropped VRP, the route will be invalidated by the less specific VRP.

Because of this risk of accidentally or maliciously invalidating routes, VRPs that have address prefixes overlapping with resources of rejected CAs are called unsafe VRPs.

In order to avoid these situations and instead fall back to an RPKI unknown state for such routes, Routinator allows to filter out these unsafe VRPs. This can be enabled via the --unsafe-vrps=reject command line option or setting unsafe-vrps=reject in the config file.

By default, this filter is currently disabled but warnings are logged about unsafe VRPs. This allows to assess the operation impact of such a filter. Depending on this assessment, the default may change in future version.

One exception from this rule are CAs that have the full address space assigned, i.e., 0.0.0.0/0 and ::/0. Adding these to the filter would wipe out all VRPs. These prefixes are used by the RIR trust anchors to avoid having to update these often. However, each RIR has its own address space so losing all VRPs should something happen to a trust anchor is unnecessary.

Relaxed Decoding

The documents defining RPKI include a number of very strict rules regarding the formatting of the objects published in the RPKI repository. However, because RPKI reuses existing technology, real-world applications produce objects that do not follow these strict requirements.

As a consequence, a significant portion of the RPKI repository is actually invalid if the rules are followed. We therefore introduce two decoding modes: strict and relaxed. Strict mode rejects any object that does not pass all checks laid out by the relevant RFCs. Relaxed mode ignores a number of these checks.

This memo documents the violations we encountered and are dealing with in relaxed decoding mode.

Resource Certificates (RFC 6487)

Resource certificates are defined as a profile on the more general Internet PKI certificates defined in RFC 5280.

Subject and Issuer

The RFC restricts the type used for CommonName attributes to PrintableString, allowing only a subset of ASCII characters, while RFC 5280 allows a number of additional string types. At least one CA produces resource certificates with Utf8Strings.

In relaxed mode, we will only check that the general structure of the issuer and subject fields are correct and allow any number and types of attributes. This seems justified since RPKI explicitly does not use these fields.

Signed Objects (RFC 6488)

Signed objects are defined as a profile on CMS messages defined in RFC 5652.

DER Encoding

RFC 6488 demands all signed objects to be DER encoded while the more general CMS format allows any BER encoding – DER is a stricter subset of the more general BER. At least one CA does indeed produce BER encoded signed objects.

In relaxed mode, we will allow BER encoding.

Note that this isn’t just nit-picking. In BER encoding, octet strings can be broken up into a sequence of sub-strings. Since those strings are in some places used to carry encoded content themselves, such an encoding does make parsing significantly more difficult. At least one CA does produce such broken-up strings.

Signals

SIGUSR1: Reload TALs and restart validation

When receiving SIGUSR1, Routinator will attempt to reload the TALs and, if that succeeds, restart validation. If loading the TALs fails, Routinator will exit.

Exit Status

Upon success, the exit status 0 is returned. If any fatal error happens, the exit status will be 1. Some commands provide a --complete option which will cause the exit status to be 2 if any of the rsync commands to update the repository fail.